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Minolta 16 E.E, 16mm Camera, c1963

Milnolta 16 EE, an all metal and solidly built camera for twenty 10 x 14mm exposures on un-perforated 16mm film. Auto exposure via the large selenium cell on the front. Shutter speed is pre-determined by the film speed setting, thus ASA25 = 30th sec, then through the standard shutter speeds until 400ASA = 400th sec. The camera indicates whether, or not, there is sufficient light by virtue of a green circular window visible in the top right corner of the viewfinder, if you can see it - there's enough light. This is just the end of a small green prism let into the viewfinder that is uncovered by a lever powered by current drawn from the seleniun cell. The main case is satin chrome plated whilst the front is grey enamel. A standard tripod mount and flash synchronizing plug are fitted and there is a neat filter holder which pops out against a spring.

Focus can be adjusted with a two position zone focus control on the underside, which being out of sight is annoyingly easy to forget.... The two positions equate to 7ft and 16ft, at which point the depth of field is expected to take up the slack.

Click on "this camera's pics" button, below, to see sample images.

Minolta 16 E.E, 16mm Camera, c1963
Body No.119265
Shutter, guillotine, speeds 30 to 400th
Lens, Rokkor, 25mm f/2.8
Condition, 5F
The film cassette drops into the film chamber via a hatch on the bottom, opening the camera resets the counter to zero, the rod protruding from the middle of the open film chamber is sprung loaded, it both pops open the hatch when released and allows the film counter to reset. In this type of camera the film travelled from one light proof side to another, so there was no need to rewind the film at the end of the roll. In order to use this camera, we chop up short lenghs of easily available film and spool it into our one surviving 16mm cassette. Also in this view is the two position scale focus switch, shown in the closer of the two positions.

Mentioned in the main paragraph is the filter holder, easily missed at first glance but a neat little touch from Minolta. A light finger pressure towards the top on the lens surround, releases the frame and out it pops. The recess underneath is where the filter sits. In this image the UV filter has just been cleaned and is about to go back in. The filter itself is lightly etched with its identity. We also have yellow filters and a 2 dioptre close up supplementary lens that slip in too.

Changing filters is best done on the desk, as they are tiny, a bit fiddly and hard to spot in tall grass.....


 

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